Advice for americans dating germans


10-Dec-2015 06:56

While most stereotypes aren’t fully true (how can you say a country of 80 million people are all the same? Germans are very punctual One of my German friends told me that Germans consider it better “to be 30 minutes early, than 5 minutes late,” which I find true. And while most Germans will blame Bavarians for all their stereotypes, being a Canadian living in Germany, I can’t help but notice some of these stereotypes on a day to day basis (I live in Baden-Württemberg).There, I made lots of German friends and had the time of my life partying with them almost every night.So when I told people back in Canada that I was planning on moving to Germany, and people would respond with, “those Germans seem like really cold people,” I was genuinely surprised. After living in Germany for a few months now, here’s my observations on the most popular German stereotypes. Of course when you do run late, they’ll tell you it’s fine, but underneath their happy, smiling exterior, you can totally sense their disappointment. In the land of punctuality, for some reason the Deutsche Bahn is never fully reliable.

All Germans seem united in their hatred for the Deutsche Bahn, so just work that into your excuse, and your tardiness will be forgiven.

If there’s one country that people seem to love stereotyping, it’s Germany. Instead, I find Germans to really want a purpose in everything (perhaps so they can pencil it into their schedules).

Perhaps it’s from the image of Germans that Hollywood movies give, but I always find that people hardly ever give you a neutral response when you mention the word “Germany” or “Germans.” Example 1: Person: Hey, so I’m moving to Iceland. So instead, something like “Hey, let’s meet for coffee on Thursday at exactly 17.27” would be the correct German response.

Living in Germany, I can sort of see why people think that.

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While not all Germans I’ve met do this, most of them do like having a plan for the day. ” because that would be too vague, and perhaps bordering on chaotic for a structured German day.

Sure, it’s common to write down deadlines for school assignments, and work shifts, but I was surprised that everything from “call so and so” and “grocery shopping” were all written down.